Family Violence Initiative

COMPENDIUM OF PROMISING PRACTICES TO REDUCE VIOLENCE AND INCREASE SAFETY OF ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN CANADA – COMPENDIUM ANNEX: DETAILED PRACTICE DESCRIPTIONS

INTERACTIONS WITHIN COMMUNITIES

Healthy Relationships: Women

Program name:

Women's Right to be Safe

Organization:

Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of BC (NCCABC)

Location:

North Vancouver, British Columbia

Target Group:

Women of all ages, children.

Contact Name:

Darlene Shackelly

Phone:

604-985-5355 ext: 302

Email:

dshackelly@nccabc.net

Website:

http://nccabc.ca/

Program Overview
History:

The Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of BC (NCCABC) is a non-profit society that has been in operation for 38 years. The Association is co-funded by the Department of Justice Canada, and the British Columbia Ministry of the Solicitor General. In 2004, NCCABC published "Trust Your Instincts: A Guidebook for Women Who Work and Travel Alone". A further publication "Women's Right to Be Safe" was published in 2011.

Program Description
Goals & Objectives:

To provide personal safety information to Aboriginal women of all ages.

Traditional/Indigenous ways:

N/A

Components of program:

The publication focuses on prevention based knowledge, education, and awareness of potential harm. Through stories, role models, information and tips, the publication addresses safety in the areas of cyber safety, young women, rights of children and community relationship building. The publication offers knowledge – i.e. think about these things before you embark on a course of action i.e. hitchhiking – here is what you might consider before getting into a car.

Services/How they work:

The publication is offered in the community.

Funding:

Funding is provided by the Department of Justice Canada.

Relationships and Stakeholders
Involvement of Target Groups:

Aboriginal women role models were identified for the publication. These women provided NCCABC with their stories. These Aboriginal women are all well known in BC, and provide strong role models and leadership in their communities, ranging from the arts (actor); an activist for women's rights; a university assistant professor; a past community health representative; and a First Nations political leader for BC. The guide also earmarked young women who are just beginning their careers to make positive choices for their future.

Partners:

NCCABC works with many organizations throughout BC. The publication was distributed to Aboriginal organizations, service providers, First Nations communities, Aboriginal education counsellors in schools throughout BC.

Other relationships:

N/A

Details of Program Evaluation
Evaluation:

No evaluation has been completed.

Highlights of Evaluation Findings:

N/A

Program Outcomes
Measures of Success:

Success is measured against the continued demand for the publication.

Achievements:

The publication provides safety knowledge and information, and was designed for Aboriginal women, yet is generic enough that all women can learn from it.

Challenges:

Managing the time constraints of the funding process. The challenge of designing the publication to inform and not to "lecture".

Things to Know to Replicate
Replication Advice:

The program is considered replicable. The publication/format can be used across jurisdictions. The knowledge is transferable. Each jurisdiction would need to make the content resonate with its community by adding its own role models, stories and resources specific to the jurisdiction.

Resources:

Adequate funding would need to be acquired for the program to operate and publish the material. Community leaders and role models would need to be willing to participate to ensure the publication was a success.

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